An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure!

Posts tagged ‘Vitamin C’

Low Levels of Vitamin C Increase Risk For Heart Failure Patients

Important New Research From University of Ulsan In Korea Reported.

The American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Nursing Research funded the study.

Low levels of vitamin C were associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C – Reactive protein (hsCRP) and shorter intervals without major cardiac issues or death for heart failure patients,
in research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2011.

Compared to those with high vitamin C intake, heart failure patients in the study who had low vitamin C intake were 2.4 times more likely to have higher levels of hsCRP, a marker for inflammation and a risk factor for heart disease.

The study demonstrates that low vitamin C intake is associated with worse outcomes for heart failure patients.

Study participants with low vitamin C intake and hsCRP over 3 milligrams per liter (mg/L) were also nearly twice as likely to die from cardiovascular disease within one year of follow-up.

“We found that adequate intake of vitamin C was associated with longer survival in patients with heart failure,” said researchers from Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, in the University of Ulsan in Korea.

The average age among the 212 patients in the study was 61, two thirds were men and about one-third were women. Approximately 45 percent of the participants had moderate to severe heart failure.

Participants completed a four-day food diary verified by a registered dietitian and a software program calculated their vitamin C intake. Bloods tests measured hsCRP.

Researchers divided participants into one group with levels over 3 mg/L of hsCRP and another with lower levels. Patients were followed for one year to determine the length of time to their first visit to the emergency department due to cardiac problems or death.

Researchers found that 82 patients (39 %) had inadequate vitamin C intake, according to criteria set by the Institute of Medicine. These criteria allowed the researchers to estimate the likelihood that the patient’s diet was habitually deficient in vitamin C based on a four day food diary.

After a year follow-up, 61 patients (29 percent) had cardiac events, which included an emergency department visit or hospitalization due to cardiac problems, or cardiac death.

The researchers found that 98 patients (46 percent) had hsCRP over 3 mg/L. Inflammatory pathways in heart failure patients may be why vitamin C deficiency contributed to poor health outcomes, the data suggests.

“Increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein means a worsening of heart failure,” the researchers explained. “An adequate level of vitamin C is associated with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. This results in a longer cardiac event-free survival in patients.”

The use of diuretics may also play a role because vitamin C is water soluble and diuretics increase the amount of water excreted from the kidneys, explained researchers also participating in the study and co-authors from College of Nursing at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky.

Vitamin C Rich Foods
“Diet is the best source of vitamin C,” the researchers said. “Eating the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables each day provides adequate amount.” More randomized controlled trials and studies are needed to determine the impact of other micro-nutrients on survival or re-hospitalization, they said.

The American Heart Association,  the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Nursing Research funded the study.

Story Source: American Heart Association.

American Heart Association (2011, November 13).
“Low vitamin C levels may raise heart failure patients’ risk.”

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;
It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact your doctor or healthcare professional for medical and nutritional consultation.

Advertisements

Fruit & Veggies May Prevent Lymph Cancers

Image

Increased intakes of antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, says a new study from the Mayo Clinic

Intakes of vitamin C, alpha-carotene, and antioxidant compounds known as proanthocyanidins were associated with reductions in the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma of 22, 29, and 30 percent, respectively, according to findings published in the International Journal of Cancer.

From a nutritional food perspective, the researchers report that yellow-orange and cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, were found to confer the greatest risk reductions.

This has mechanistic implications (potential synergies between antioxidants; other anti-carcinogenic compounds in these foods) and also suggests that prevention approaches will likely need to be targeted towards foods and specific antioxidant-rich food groups.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a cancer that starts in the lymphatic system and encompasses about 29 different forms of lymphoma. According to the American Cancer Society, over 50,000 new cases are diagnosed in the US every year.

Study Details In collaboration with scientists from the University of Minnesota, the Mayo Clinic researchers examined data from 35,159 Iowa women aged between 55 and 69 participating in the Iowa women’s health study. Diets were analyzed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

Over 20 years of follow-up, a total of 415 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma weredocumented. Intakes of 204 or more servings per month (about 7 servings

per day) of all fruit and vegetables were associated with a 31 percent reduction in NHL risk, compared to intakes of less than 104 servings per month.

High intakes of yellow-orange vegetables (14 or more servings of per month) were associated with a risk reduction of 28 percent, as were four or more broccoli servings per month, compared to people who are no broccoli.

Considering the nutrients, in addition to the risk reductions associated with increased intakes of vitamin C, alpha-carotene, and the antioxidants known as roanthocyanidins, increased intakes of manganese from dietary sources was also associated with a risk reduction of about 40 per cent.

“To our knowledge, an inverse association with manganese has not been previously evaluated for NHL, and thus this will require replication,” they wrote. “Foods rich in manganese include whole grains, nuts, and leafy vegetables. However, we observed no clear association with foods that are major sources of manganese.”

“These results support a role for vegetables and perhaps fruits, and associated antioxidants from food sources, as protective factors against the development of NHL and follicular lymphoma in particular,” they concluded.

Source: International Journal of Cancer “Antioxidant intake from fruits, vegetables and other sources and risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma: The Iowa women’s health study”

This article is for informational and educational purposes only; It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

 

Vitamin C Beneficial For Asthmatic Children: New Study

Ambersweet oranges, a new cold-resistant orang...

Image via Wikipedia

Vitamin C has a beneficial effect against asthma, according to a study published in the journal “Clinical and Translational Allergy” The benefits depend on the age of asthmatic children, on their exposure to molds or dampness, and on the severity of their asthma.

Research scientists from the University of Helsinki in Finland analyzed the effect of 0.2 grams (200 mg) per day of vitamin C on 60 asthmatic children (aged 7 to 10 years.) The effect of vitamin C on the forced expiratory volume per one second (FEV1) was modified by age and exposure to molds or dampness. In the younger children aged 7.0 to 8.2 years with no exposure to molds or dampness, vitamin C administration increased the FEV1 level by 37%.

In the older children aged 8.3 to 10 years with exposure to molds or dampness in their bedroom more than one year before the study, vitamin C increased the FEV1 level by only 21%.

The effect of vitamin C on the asthma symptoms was modified by age and the severity of asthma symptoms. In the younger children aged 7.0 to 8.2 years with mild asthma symptoms, the benefit of vitamin C was greatest. In the older children aged 8.3 to 10 years who had severe asthma symptoms, the benefit of vitamin C was smallest.

The researchers conclude that there is strong evidence that the effect of vitamin C on asthmatic children is heterogeneous. They consider that it is important to carry out further research to confirm their findings and to more accurately identify the groups of children who would receive the greatest benefit from vitamin C supplementation.

Story Source:
University of Helsinki

Journal Reference:
Vitamin C and asthma in children: modification of the effect
by age, exposure to dampness and the severity of asthma” Clinical and Translational Allergy, 2011;

This article is for informational and  educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical  advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult with your doctor or healthcare  professional for medical and nutrition advice.

Tag Cloud