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Posts tagged ‘Stroke’

Vitamin Therapy Can Reduce Stroke, Researchers Report In AMA Journal

J C Herbal ProductsA commentary by University of Western Ontario’s David Spence and Harvard School of Public Health’s Dr. Meir Stampfer in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association argues vitamin therapy has an important role to play in reducing stroke.

Vitamin B therapy is widely used to lower homocysteine levels and too much of this amino acid in the bloodstream was linked to increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Intake of B vitamins results in a protective cardiovascular benefit.

A study by Spence, a scientist with the Robarts Research Institute at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, found Vitamin B therapy actually increased cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

He says this commentary provides insights that overturn the widespread belief that homocysteine is dead. He says two key issues have been overlooked in the interpretation of several clinical trials: the key role of vitamin B12, and the newly recognized role of renal failure.

“It is now clear that the large trials showing no benefit of vitamin therapy obscured the benefit of vitamin therapy because they lumped together patients with renal failure and those with good renal function, says Spence, the author of How to Prevent Your Stroke.

“The vitamins are harmful in renal failure, and beneficial in patients with good renal function, and they cancel each other out.”

The commentary also contends most of the trials did not use a high enough dose of vitamin B12.

Story Source:
University of Western Ontario.

Journal Reference:
Understanding the Complexity of Homocysteine Lowering
With Vitamins: The Potential

Role of Subgroup Analyses. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2011;

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;
It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

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Study: Red Meat Intake Increases Risk Of Stroke

Stroke Diagram

Stroke Diagram (Photo credit: ConstructionDealMkting)

Important followup study reports…

Red Meat Boosts Risk Of Stroke

Eating more red meat increases the risk of stroke, according to a new meta-analysis by researchers in Poland and Sweden. Previous research on meat and stroke risk has shown a range of results, so scientists combined 6 studies totaling 329,495 participants and 10,630 cases of stroke to obtain more definitive answers.

The researchers concluded that each additional one serving per day of red meat was associated with an 11%-13% greater risk of stroke. The added risk was indicated entirely in ischemic stroke, the most common kind, and not in hemorrhagic stroke.

All types of red meat, including fresh meat, beef, steak, as well as processed meats such as bacon and sausage, and pork (also known as “the other white meat“), were linked to extra stroke risk; Not surprisingly, processed meats were linked to 13% greater risk per extra daily serving.

Research scientists involved in the study speculated that meat could increase overall stroke risk, because of its high saturated fat content, oxidative stress associated with iron in meat, as well as the commonly used preservatives in processed meats. .

 

Story Source: Stoke

Journal Reference:

 

National Stroke Association

Centennial, CO 80112 info@stroke.org

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Reduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

fruits and veggiesReduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

In a study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, Swedish women who ate an antioxidant-rich diet had fewer strokes regardless of whether they had a previous history of cardiovascular disease.

 

“Eating antioxidant-rich foods may reduce your risk of stroke by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation,” said researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. “This means people should eat more foods such as fruits and vegetables that contribute to total antioxidant capacity.”

 

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of cell-damaging free radicals and the body’s ability to neutralize them; Ultimately, it leads to inflammation, blood vessel damage and stiffening.

 

Antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, carotenoids and flavonoids can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation by scavenging the free radicals. Antioxidants, especially flavonoids, may also help improve endothelial function and reduce blood clotting, blood pressure and inflammation.

 

“In this study, we took into account all the antioxidants present in the diet, including thousands of compounds, in doses obtained from a usual diet,” the researchers explained.

 

The research team collected dietary data through a food-frequency questionnaire. They used a standard database to determine participants’ total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which measures the free radical reducing capacity of all antioxidants in the diet and considers synergistic effects between substances.

 

Researchers categorized the women according to their Total Antioxidant Capacity levels: five (5) groups without a history of cardiovascular disease and four (4) with previous cardiovascular disease.

 

For women with no history of cardiovascular disease who had the highest TAC, fruits and vegetables contributed about 50 percent of TAC.

Other contributors were whole grains (18 percent), tea (16 percent) and chocolate (5 percent).

 

The study found:

Higher TAC was related to lower stroke rates in women without cardiovascular disease.

 

Women without cardiovascular disease with the highest levels of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 17 percent lower risk of total stroke compared to those in the lowest quintile.

 

Women with history of cardiovascular disease in the highest three quartiles of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 46 percent to 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke compared with those in the lowest quartile.

“Women with a high antioxidant intake may be more health conscious and have the sort of healthy behaviors that may have influenced our results,” the researchers cautioned… “However, the observed inverse association between dietary TAC and stroke persisted after adjustments for potential confounders related to healthy behavior such as smoking, physical activity and education.”

 

For the study, researchers used the Swedish Mammography Cohort to identify 31,035 heart disease-free women and 5,680 women with a history of heart disease in two counties. The women were 49-83 years old.

 

Researchers tracked the cardiovascular disease-free women an average 11.5 years and the women with cardiovascular disease 9.6 years, from September 1997 through the date of first stroke, death or Dec. 31, 2009, whichever came first.

 

Researchers identified 1,322 strokes among cardiovascular disease-free women and 1,007 strokes among women with a history of cardiovascular disease from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

 

“To the best of our knowledge, no study has assessed the relation between dietary TAC and stroke risk in participants with a previous history of cardiovascular disease,” they said. “Further studies are needed to assess the link between dietary TAC and stroke risk in men and in people in other countries, but we think our results are applicable.”

 

The Swedish Research Council for Infrastructure and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research funded the study.

 

Story Source:  American Heart Association.

 

Journal Reference: STROKE: “Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort of Women”

 

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact your doctor or healthcare professional for medical and nutritional consultation.

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