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Posts tagged ‘heart disease’

Sugar Sweetened Beverages Increase Risk Of Heart Disease

Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Disease in Men
Cola Drinks
Men who drank a sugar-sweetened beverage (12-ounces) a day had a 20 percent higher risk of heart disease compared to men who didn’t
drink any sugar-sweetened drinks, according to research published in Circulation, an American Heart Association journal.

“This study adds to the growing evidence that sugary beverages are detrimental to cardiovascular health,” said researchers from the department of nutrition and epidemiology in the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass. “Certainly, it provides strong justification for reducing sugary beverage consumption among patients, and more importantly, in the general population.”

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The most crucial risk factors include obesity, smoking, physical inactivity, diabetes and poor diet.
Researchers, who studied 42,883 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, found that the increase persisted even after controlling for other risk factors, including smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol use and family history of heart disease. Less frequent consumption of the sweetened beverages such as twice weekly and twice monthly  did not increase risk.
Researchers also measured different lipids and proteins in the blood, which are indicators (biomarkers) for heart disease. These included the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP), harmful lipids called triglycerides and good lipids called high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Compared to non-drinkers, those who consumed sugary beverages daily had higher triglyceride and CRP and lower HDL levels.
Artificially sweetened beverages were not linked to increased risk or biomarkers for heart disease in this particular study.
Beginning in January 1986 and every two years until December 2008, participants responded to questionnaires about diet and other health habits. They also provided a blood sample halfway through the survey. Follow-up was 22 years.
Participants were primarily Caucasian men 40-75 years old. All were employed in a health-related profession.
Health habits of the men in the study may differ from those of the general public, but findings in women from the 2009 Nurses’ Health Study were comparable.
The American Heart Association recommends no more than half of discretionary calories come from added sugars . For most American men, that’s no more than 150 calories per day and 100 for most American women. Discretionary calories are those left in your “energy allowance” after consuming the recommended types and amounts of foods to meet all daily nutrient requirements.
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded the analysis and the National Institutes of Health funded the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.
Story Source:  American Heart Association    Journal Reference: Sweetened Beverage Consumption, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Biomarkers of Risk in Men. Circulation, March 12 2012
American Heart Association  Sugar-sweetened drinks linked to increased risk of heart disease in men, study suggests.
This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.
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Study: Foods Fried in Olive or Sunflower Oil Is Not Linked to Heart Disease

Sunflower oil

Sunflower oil (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Eating food that’s been fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease according to research published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The authors explain that their study took place in Spain, a Mediterranean country where olive or sunflower oil is used for frying and their results would probably not be the same in another culture or country where other cooking oilsand re-used oils were used for frying.

Olive oil from Imperia in Liguria, Italy.

Olive oil from Imperia in Liguria, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Western countries, frying is one of the most common methods of cooking. When food is fried, it increases calorie content because the food absorbs the fat of the oils.

It’s established that eating large amounts of fried food can increase certain heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity; The link between fried food and heart disease is continually investigated.

Research scientists from Autonomous University of Madrid, surveyed the cooking methods of 40,757 adults aged 29 to 69 over an 11-year period. None of the participants had heart disease when the study began.

Professional interviewers asked participants about their diet and cooking methods. Fried food was defined as food for which frying was the only cooking method used. Additional relevant questions were asked about whether food was fried, battered, crumbed or sauteed.

The participants’ diet was divided into ranges of fried food consumption, the first quartile related to the lowest amount of fried food consumed and the fourth indicated the highest amount.

During the follow-up there were 606 events linked to heart disease and 1,134 deaths.

The authors conclude: “In a Mediterranean country where olive oil and sunflower oil are the most commonly used fats for frying, and where large amounts of fried foods are consumed both at and away from home, no association was observed between fried food consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease or death.”

The study diminishes the myth that “frying food is generally bad for the heart” but also explains that this “does not mean that frequent meals of fish and chips will have no health consequences.” emphasized the research reports, also explaining specific aspects of frying food are relevant, such as the type of oil used.

Story Source:

BMJ-British Medical Journal.     Journal References: Consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease: Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. BMJ, 2012; \ Fried foods and the risk of coronary heart disease. BMJ, 2012

BMJ-British Medical Journal (2012, January 24). Food fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease, Spanish study finds.

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Lack Of Sleep Can Lead To Weight Gain

Peripheral-Artery-Disease

Peripheral-Artery-Disease (Photo credit: Adams999)

 

A new study identified a new culprit that leads to atherosclerosis, the accumulation of fat and cholesterol that hardens into plaque and narrows arteries. The study was by conducted NYU Langone Medical Center researchers and published online by Nature Immunology in January 2012.

The research explains why cholesterol-laden, coronary artery disease-causing cells (called macrophages)  accumulate in artery plaques.

“We have discovered that macrophages that accumulate in plaques secrete a molecule called netrin-1,” said Kathryn J. Moore, PhD, senior author of the study and associate professor in the Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology at NYU Langone Medical Center. “Our study shows that netrin-1 blocks the normal migration of macrophages out of arteries, causing these immune cells to accumulate and promote the progression of atherosclerosis.”

Artery plaques that are known to have high macrophage cell content, break off and cause vessel blockages, or potentially fatal heart attacks and strokes. Atherosclerosis is fueled by the presence of these cholesterol-laden macrophages in the artery wall. Typically, the boy’s own immune system sends macrophages to clean up cholesterol deposits in arteries;

However, once they fill up with the unhealthy form of cholesterol they get stuck in the arteries, triggering the body’s inflammatory response. The bloated macrophages then become major components of plaque lining artery walls.

Until now, the mechanism by which macrophages become trapped has remained unknown.In this new study, researchers show why macrophages remain in artery plaques leading to atherosclerosis. Netrin-1 promotes atherosclerosis by retaining macrophages in the artery wall. In fact, netrin-1 signals macrophages to stop migrating and as a result these cells accumulate within the plaque.

In addition, study experiments show, genetically deleting netrin-1 can minimize atherosclerosis, reduce the level of macrophages in plaque and promote the migration of macrophages from plaques.

In the study, the research scientists used a florescent tracking technique to label and monitor the movement of macrophage cells in and out of plaques. This experiment showed how macrophages were immobilized and retained in plaque by netrin-1 expression and also demonstrated macrophage emigration from plaque after the deletion of netrin-1.

“Our study identifies netrin-1 as a novel target for future therapeutic intervention for the treatment of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease,” said Janine M. van Gils, PhD, the lead author of the study and a post-doctoral researcher in the Marc and Ruti Bell Vascular Biology and Disease Program, Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Dept. of Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

“This discovery provides new clues to help reduce the amount of plaque in arteries and the threat of atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality in Western countries. The development of a new strategy to diminish macrophage accumulation in plaque offers great promise to reducing the occurrence of fatal cardiac events.”

Story Source: NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine.

Journal Reference: The neuroimmune guidance cue netrin-1 promotes atherosclerosis by inhibiting the emigration of macrophages from plaques. Nature Immunology, 2012;

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine (2012, January 9).

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Benefits of Nut Consumptio​n for People With Abdominal Obesity, High Blood Sugar, High Blood Pressure

Scientists now are reporting a significant link between eating nuts and higher levels of serotonin in the bodies of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) who are at high risk for heart disease. Serotonin is a substance that helps transmit nerve signals and decreases feelings of hunger, makes people feel happier and improves heart health. It took only one ounce of mixed nuts (raw unpeeled walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts) a day to produce the beneficial effects.

The report appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research

Resaerchers from the Biomarkers & NutriMetabolomics Research Group of the University of Barcelona in collaboration with the Human Nutrition Unit of the Rovira i Virgili University explain that the rise in obesity around the world means more and more patients have metabolic syndrome. Symptoms include excess abdominal fat, high blood sugar and high blood pressure, which increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Dietary changes may help patients reduce the excess weight and become healthier. They’re recommending increased regular consumption of nuts, which are packed with healthful nutrients, such as healthy fats (unsaturated fatty acids) and antioxidants (polyphenols). Nuts have been recommended to fight the metabolic abnormalities associated with MetS.

To check the biochemical effects of nut consumption, the researchers put 22 MetS patients on a nut-enriched diet for 12 weeks and compared them to another group of 20 patients who were told to avoid nuts.

The scientists analyzed the broad spectrum of compounds excreted in the patients’ urine and found evidence of several healthful changes. One surprise was evidence that nut consumption had boosted patients’ levels of serotonin metabolites in urine, since these findings suggest the role of serotonin in the beneficial effects of nuts. They point out that the study provides the first evidence in humans of the beneficial effects of nut consumption in reducing levels of substances in the body associated with inflammation and other cardiovascular risk factors in patients with metabolic syndrome.

Journal Reference: Metabolomics Unveils Urinary Changes in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome following 12-Week Nut Consumption. Journal of Proteome Research, 2011;

American Chemical Society (2011, November 2). Benefits of nut consumption for people with abdominal obesity, high blood sugar, high blood pressure.

This article is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact your doctor or healthcare professional for medical and nutritional consultation.

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