An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure!

Posts tagged ‘Cardiovascular disease’

Red Meat Consumptio​n Linked to Increased Risk of Cardio Disease and Cancer

FROM RED MEAT TO ASH-A FOUR WEEK LABORATORY PR...

FROM RED MEAT TO ASH-A FOUR WEEK LABORATORY PROCEDURE FOR MEASURING GAMMA RADIATION AT EPA'S LAS VEGAS NATIONAL... - NARA - 548867 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers have found that red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of total, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. 

The results also confirmed that substituting other healthy protein sources, such as fish, poultry, nuts, and legumes was associated with a lower risk of mortality.

The study was published online in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

“Our study adds more evidence to the health risks of eating high amounts of red meat, which has been associated with type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and certain cancers in other studies,” said researchers from  the Department of Nutrition at HSPH.

The research scientists from the department of nutrition and epidemiology at HSPH, and colleagues, prospectively observed 37,698 men from the “Health Professionals Follow-up Study” for up to 22 years and 83,644 women in the “Nurses’ Health Study” for up to 28 years who were free of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer at base-line. Diets were assessed through questionnaires every four years.

A combined 23,926 deaths were documented in the two studies of which 5,910 were from CVD and 9,464 from cancer. Regular consumption of red meat, (Most especially processed red meat) was associated with increased mortality risk.

One daily serving of unprocessed red meat (about the size of a hamburger or small 8 oz steak) was associated with a 13% increased risk of mortality, and one daily serving of processed red meat (one hot dog or two slices of bacon) was associated with a 20% increased risk.

For cardiovascular mortality, the corresponding increases in risk were 18% and 21% while it was 10% and 16% for cancer mortality. The analytical reports took into account chronic disease risk factors such as age, body mass index, physical activity, family history of heart disease, or major cancers.

Red meat, particularly processed meats, contains ingredients that are linked to increased risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. These include heme iron, saturated fat, sodium, nitrites, and certain carcinogens that are formed during cooking.

Replacing one serving of total red meat with one serving of a healthy protein source was associated with a lower mortality risk: 7% for fish, 14% for poultry, 19% for nuts, 10% for legumes, 10% for low-fat dairy products, and 14% for whole grains.

The researchers estimated that 9.3% of deaths in men and 7.6% in women could have been prevented at the end of the follow-up if all the participants had consumed less than 0.5 servings per day of red meat.

“This study provides clear evidence that regular consumption of red meat, especially processed meat, contributes substantially to premature death,” said the researchers.

Substituting Other Healthy Protein Sources Including: Fish, Poultry, Nuts and Legumes Was Associated With Lower Risk of Mortality

The researchers confirmed… “On the other hand, choosing more healthful sources of protein in place of red meat can confer significant health benefits by reducing chronic disease morbidity and mortality.”

Support for the study was provided by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Cancer Institute.

Source: Harvard School of Public Health

References: “Red Meat Consumption and Mortality,”  Archives of Internal Medicine, online March 12, 2012

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Magnesium Lowers Blood Pressure, New Study Reports

 

BLOOD PRESSURE CHECK

BLOOD PRESSURE CHECK (Photo credit: Morning Calm News)

Researchers from the University of Hertfordshire have found that magnesium supplements may provide clinically significant reductions in blood pressure.

In a report published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers also discovered that the measure of the effect increased in proportion with increased dosage.

Cardiovascular diseases cause almost 50% of deaths in Europe and contribute heavily to escalating healthcare costs. Elevated blood pressure or hypertension is a major risk factor for mortality from cardiovascular and renal disease.

Causes of hypertension include smoking, an inactive, sedentary lifestyle, a diet high in sodium and an inadequate intake of specific nutrients, especially minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium.

 

“Until now, there’s been inconclusive evidence regarding the effect of magnesium supplements on blood pressure,” explained the researchers from the University of Hertfordshire. “So we conducted a meta-analysis by analysing data from twenty-two trials involving 1,173 people to assess the effect of magnesium on blood pressure.”

 

In the trials, the magnesium supplementation doses ranged from 120 to 973 mg with between 3 to 24 weeks of follow-up.  Although not all individual trials showed significance in blood pressure reduction, by combining the trials, the overall data indicated that daily magnesium supplementation reduced both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The best results were observed at the higher dosages.

 

“The clinical significance in the reductions found from this meta-analysis may be important in helping to prevent hypertension and associated risks around cardiovascular disease,”the researchers reported … “And is worthy of future trials using solid methodology.”

 

Story Source: University of Hertfordshire

Journal Reference: “Effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis.” European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012;

 

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor, physician or healthcare professional.

 

 

 

Reduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

fruits and veggiesReduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

In a study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, Swedish women who ate an antioxidant-rich diet had fewer strokes regardless of whether they had a previous history of cardiovascular disease.

 

“Eating antioxidant-rich foods may reduce your risk of stroke by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation,” said researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. “This means people should eat more foods such as fruits and vegetables that contribute to total antioxidant capacity.”

 

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of cell-damaging free radicals and the body’s ability to neutralize them; Ultimately, it leads to inflammation, blood vessel damage and stiffening.

 

Antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, carotenoids and flavonoids can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation by scavenging the free radicals. Antioxidants, especially flavonoids, may also help improve endothelial function and reduce blood clotting, blood pressure and inflammation.

 

“In this study, we took into account all the antioxidants present in the diet, including thousands of compounds, in doses obtained from a usual diet,” the researchers explained.

 

The research team collected dietary data through a food-frequency questionnaire. They used a standard database to determine participants’ total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which measures the free radical reducing capacity of all antioxidants in the diet and considers synergistic effects between substances.

 

Researchers categorized the women according to their Total Antioxidant Capacity levels: five (5) groups without a history of cardiovascular disease and four (4) with previous cardiovascular disease.

 

For women with no history of cardiovascular disease who had the highest TAC, fruits and vegetables contributed about 50 percent of TAC.

Other contributors were whole grains (18 percent), tea (16 percent) and chocolate (5 percent).

 

The study found:

Higher TAC was related to lower stroke rates in women without cardiovascular disease.

 

Women without cardiovascular disease with the highest levels of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 17 percent lower risk of total stroke compared to those in the lowest quintile.

 

Women with history of cardiovascular disease in the highest three quartiles of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 46 percent to 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke compared with those in the lowest quartile.

“Women with a high antioxidant intake may be more health conscious and have the sort of healthy behaviors that may have influenced our results,” the researchers cautioned… “However, the observed inverse association between dietary TAC and stroke persisted after adjustments for potential confounders related to healthy behavior such as smoking, physical activity and education.”

 

For the study, researchers used the Swedish Mammography Cohort to identify 31,035 heart disease-free women and 5,680 women with a history of heart disease in two counties. The women were 49-83 years old.

 

Researchers tracked the cardiovascular disease-free women an average 11.5 years and the women with cardiovascular disease 9.6 years, from September 1997 through the date of first stroke, death or Dec. 31, 2009, whichever came first.

 

Researchers identified 1,322 strokes among cardiovascular disease-free women and 1,007 strokes among women with a history of cardiovascular disease from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

 

“To the best of our knowledge, no study has assessed the relation between dietary TAC and stroke risk in participants with a previous history of cardiovascular disease,” they said. “Further studies are needed to assess the link between dietary TAC and stroke risk in men and in people in other countries, but we think our results are applicable.”

 

The Swedish Research Council for Infrastructure and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research funded the study.

 

Story Source:  American Heart Association.

 

Journal Reference: STROKE: “Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort of Women”

 

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact your doctor or healthcare professional for medical and nutritional consultation.

Tag Cloud