An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure!

Archive for the ‘Fruits & Veggies’ Category

Fruit & Veggies May Prevent Lymph Cancers

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Increased intakes of antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, says a new study from the Mayo Clinic

Intakes of vitamin C, alpha-carotene, and antioxidant compounds known as proanthocyanidins were associated with reductions in the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma of 22, 29, and 30 percent, respectively, according to findings published in the International Journal of Cancer.

From a nutritional food perspective, the researchers report that yellow-orange and cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, were found to confer the greatest risk reductions.

This has mechanistic implications (potential synergies between antioxidants; other anti-carcinogenic compounds in these foods) and also suggests that prevention approaches will likely need to be targeted towards foods and specific antioxidant-rich food groups.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a cancer that starts in the lymphatic system and encompasses about 29 different forms of lymphoma. According to the American Cancer Society, over 50,000 new cases are diagnosed in the US every year.

Study Details In collaboration with scientists from the University of Minnesota, the Mayo Clinic researchers examined data from 35,159 Iowa women aged between 55 and 69 participating in the Iowa women’s health study. Diets were analyzed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

Over 20 years of follow-up, a total of 415 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma weredocumented. Intakes of 204 or more servings per month (about 7 servings

per day) of all fruit and vegetables were associated with a 31 percent reduction in NHL risk, compared to intakes of less than 104 servings per month.

High intakes of yellow-orange vegetables (14 or more servings of per month) were associated with a risk reduction of 28 percent, as were four or more broccoli servings per month, compared to people who are no broccoli.

Considering the nutrients, in addition to the risk reductions associated with increased intakes of vitamin C, alpha-carotene, and the antioxidants known as roanthocyanidins, increased intakes of manganese from dietary sources was also associated with a risk reduction of about 40 per cent.

“To our knowledge, an inverse association with manganese has not been previously evaluated for NHL, and thus this will require replication,” they wrote. “Foods rich in manganese include whole grains, nuts, and leafy vegetables. However, we observed no clear association with foods that are major sources of manganese.”

“These results support a role for vegetables and perhaps fruits, and associated antioxidants from food sources, as protective factors against the development of NHL and follicular lymphoma in particular,” they concluded.

Source: International Journal of Cancer “Antioxidant intake from fruits, vegetables and other sources and risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma: The Iowa women’s health study”

This article is for informational and educational purposes only; It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

 

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Who Is Less Likely to Develop Cancer?

ImageVegetarians will develop less blood, bladder and stomach cancer than meat eaters, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

The grouping of two studies featured more than 61,000 vegetarians over a time span of 12 years and found they contracted less cancer, independent of factors such as smoking, alcohol use and obesity than those who consumed meat or fish or both.

Differences in stomach and bowel cancer rates were not as pronounced as may have been expected based on previous research. It is interesting to note, vegetarians had slightly higher, but not significantly so, rates of colon and rectum cancer.

Cervical cancer rates were twice that of meat-eaters among vegetarians. Breast and prostate cancer rates were similar, although there was less risk for prostate cancer among fish eaters than meat eaters.

Participants were drawn from a pool of British men and women who were either meat eaters and/or fish eaters or vegetarians. Of the total study population, 3,350 were diagnosed with one or more of the twenty cancers the researchers tested for.

They noted that 33 out of a hundred meat eaters will develop some form of cancer compared to 29 out of 100 non-meat eaters.

For some cancers such as multiple myeloma, which strikes bone marrow, vegetarians were 75 per cent less likely develop the condition.

Cancers of the blood and lymph such as leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were 50 per cent less likely in vegetarians than carnivores.”At the moment these findings are not strong enough to ask for particularly large changes in the diets of people following an average balanced diet. More research is needed to substantiate these results and to look for reasons for the differences,” explained the lead researcher from the Cancer Research UK epidemiology unit at Oxford University.

The researchers said the reasons for lower cancer rates among vegetarians were not clear but suggested it could be down to viruses and mutation-causing compounds found in meat such as N-nitroso which are thought to damage DNA.

The temperatures at which meats are cooked could also produce damaging carcinogens.

The study population contained 15,571 men and 45,995 women, one third of whom were vegetarian.

Levels of physical activity were higher in vegetarians and fish-only eaters than in meat eaters, who also had higher body mass index readings (BMIs).

But the researchers said none of the findings were conclusive despite some evidence linking, for instance, high intake of fruit and vegetables and onset rates of some cancers.

“There is also some evidence that a high intake of fruit and vegetables might reduce the risk for stomach cancer, but the data are not consistent and, although on average vegetarians eat more fruit and vegetables than meat eaters, the difference in intake is modest,” they wrote.

Source: British Journal of Cancer (2009) 101, 192-197. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605098 ‘Cancer incidence in British vegetarians’

This article is for informational and educational purposes only; It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Reduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

fruits and veggiesReduce Risk of Stroke By Eating Vegetables​, Fruits, and Grains

In a study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, Swedish women who ate an antioxidant-rich diet had fewer strokes regardless of whether they had a previous history of cardiovascular disease.

 

“Eating antioxidant-rich foods may reduce your risk of stroke by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation,” said researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. “This means people should eat more foods such as fruits and vegetables that contribute to total antioxidant capacity.”

 

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of cell-damaging free radicals and the body’s ability to neutralize them; Ultimately, it leads to inflammation, blood vessel damage and stiffening.

 

Antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, carotenoids and flavonoids can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation by scavenging the free radicals. Antioxidants, especially flavonoids, may also help improve endothelial function and reduce blood clotting, blood pressure and inflammation.

 

“In this study, we took into account all the antioxidants present in the diet, including thousands of compounds, in doses obtained from a usual diet,” the researchers explained.

 

The research team collected dietary data through a food-frequency questionnaire. They used a standard database to determine participants’ total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which measures the free radical reducing capacity of all antioxidants in the diet and considers synergistic effects between substances.

 

Researchers categorized the women according to their Total Antioxidant Capacity levels: five (5) groups without a history of cardiovascular disease and four (4) with previous cardiovascular disease.

 

For women with no history of cardiovascular disease who had the highest TAC, fruits and vegetables contributed about 50 percent of TAC.

Other contributors were whole grains (18 percent), tea (16 percent) and chocolate (5 percent).

 

The study found:

Higher TAC was related to lower stroke rates in women without cardiovascular disease.

 

Women without cardiovascular disease with the highest levels of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 17 percent lower risk of total stroke compared to those in the lowest quintile.

 

Women with history of cardiovascular disease in the highest three quartiles of dietary TAC had a statistically significant 46 percent to 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke compared with those in the lowest quartile.

“Women with a high antioxidant intake may be more health conscious and have the sort of healthy behaviors that may have influenced our results,” the researchers cautioned… “However, the observed inverse association between dietary TAC and stroke persisted after adjustments for potential confounders related to healthy behavior such as smoking, physical activity and education.”

 

For the study, researchers used the Swedish Mammography Cohort to identify 31,035 heart disease-free women and 5,680 women with a history of heart disease in two counties. The women were 49-83 years old.

 

Researchers tracked the cardiovascular disease-free women an average 11.5 years and the women with cardiovascular disease 9.6 years, from September 1997 through the date of first stroke, death or Dec. 31, 2009, whichever came first.

 

Researchers identified 1,322 strokes among cardiovascular disease-free women and 1,007 strokes among women with a history of cardiovascular disease from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

 

“To the best of our knowledge, no study has assessed the relation between dietary TAC and stroke risk in participants with a previous history of cardiovascular disease,” they said. “Further studies are needed to assess the link between dietary TAC and stroke risk in men and in people in other countries, but we think our results are applicable.”

 

The Swedish Research Council for Infrastructure and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research funded the study.

 

Story Source:  American Heart Association.

 

Journal Reference: STROKE: “Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort of Women”

 

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact your doctor or healthcare professional for medical and nutritional consultation.

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