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Archive for August, 2012

Study: Foods Fried in Olive or Sunflower Oil Is Not Linked to Heart Disease

Sunflower oil

Sunflower oil (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Eating food that’s been fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease according to research published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The authors explain that their study took place in Spain, a Mediterranean country where olive or sunflower oil is used for frying and their results would probably not be the same in another culture or country where other cooking oilsand re-used oils were used for frying.

Olive oil from Imperia in Liguria, Italy.

Olive oil from Imperia in Liguria, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Western countries, frying is one of the most common methods of cooking. When food is fried, it increases calorie content because the food absorbs the fat of the oils.

It’s established that eating large amounts of fried food can increase certain heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity; The link between fried food and heart disease is continually investigated.

Research scientists from Autonomous University of Madrid, surveyed the cooking methods of 40,757 adults aged 29 to 69 over an 11-year period. None of the participants had heart disease when the study began.

Professional interviewers asked participants about their diet and cooking methods. Fried food was defined as food for which frying was the only cooking method used. Additional relevant questions were asked about whether food was fried, battered, crumbed or sauteed.

The participants’ diet was divided into ranges of fried food consumption, the first quartile related to the lowest amount of fried food consumed and the fourth indicated the highest amount.

During the follow-up there were 606 events linked to heart disease and 1,134 deaths.

The authors conclude: “In a Mediterranean country where olive oil and sunflower oil are the most commonly used fats for frying, and where large amounts of fried foods are consumed both at and away from home, no association was observed between fried food consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease or death.”

The study diminishes the myth that “frying food is generally bad for the heart” but also explains that this “does not mean that frequent meals of fish and chips will have no health consequences.” emphasized the research reports, also explaining specific aspects of frying food are relevant, such as the type of oil used.

Story Source:

BMJ-British Medical Journal.     Journal References: Consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease: Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. BMJ, 2012; \ Fried foods and the risk of coronary heart disease. BMJ, 2012

BMJ-British Medical Journal (2012, January 24). Food fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease, Spanish study finds.

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

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Boosting Male Fertlity With Vitamins, Minerals and Micro-Nutr​ients

Nutrient Rich

Nutrient Rich (Photo credit: DerekSteen)

New Research Demonstrates Beneficial Results of Increasing Intake of 8 Specific Nutrients For Helping Boost Sperm Quality;  Also Enhancing The Probability Of Conception

An important new study from Austria using sub-fertile males showed that 3 months of daily supplementation with a combination of specific vitamins, minerals and micro-nutrients resulted in significant improvements of sperm quality (up to 215%).

In addition, the combination of nutrients was associated with higher rates of conception, with 34 pregnancies reported during the 6 months that followed the study, compared with 11 in the control group, according to findings published in theEuropean e-Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

The Austria-based researchers used a daily combination of L-Carnitine, L-Arginine, Zinc, Vitamin E, Glutathione, Selenium, Coenzyme Q10 and Folic Acid.

The nutrients are each recognized to be required for optimal sperm cell metabolism, DNA synthesis during spermatogenesis, proliferation and protective anti-oxidative function.

The  researchers stated “In consideration of their biochemical function, these ingredients are of great significance for male reproduction”

The Important Relationship Between Nutrient Intake and Fertility
Sub-fertility in men is reported to account for between 25 and 30% of all infertility causes. It is considered as one of the key reasons that birth rates are falling in Western countries.

Nutrition has been identified as a potential way of increasing the quality of sperm.

 

The new study carefully assessed the potential of a non-prescription combination of the 8 nutrients on sperm quality in 132 sub-fertile males (mean age: 34) while 73 sub-fertile men (mean age: 38) participated as controls.

The results showed that men receiving the eight nutrients demonstrated a 33% improvement in ejaculatory volume;  a 215% improvement  in sperm cell density and a 23% improvement in total sperm motility.  “These increments were significantly higher than those observed among controls. ” the researchers explained.

 

Source:

The European e-Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism

 

(Published online 3 December 2011)

 

“Improvement of Sperm Quality After Micro-Nutrient Supplementation”

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

New Study Confirms Vitamin D Helps Protects Lung Function

20/2.2011 vitamin D

20/2.2011 vitamin D (Photo credit: julochka)

A new study reports…

Vitamin D May Protect Lung

Function in Smokers   An important new study at the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital  confirms Vitamin D deficiency is associated with rapid decline in lung function over time in smokers;  The research suggests that the “sunshine” vitamin may also help protect against the effects of smoking on lung function.

The researchers examined the relationship between vitamin D deficiency, smoking, lung function, and the rate of lung function decline over a 20 year period in a cohort of 626 adult white men from the Normative Aging Study.

They found that sufficient Vitamin D (serum vitamin D levels of >20 ng/ml) had a protective effect on lung function and slowing the rate of lung function decline in smokers.

The findings were published online in the American Thoracic Society‘s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In the study, vitamin D levels were assessed at three different time points between 1984 and 2003, and lung function was assessed using specialized analytical equipment.

“Our results suggest that vitamin D might modify the damaging effects of smoking on lung function,” said the researchers, adding… “These effects might be due to vitamin D’s anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.”

“If these results can be replicated in other studies, they could be of great public health importance,” they emphasized  “Future research should also examine whether vitamin D protects against lung damage from other sources, such as air pollution.”

“While these results are intriguing, the health hazards associated with smoking far outweigh any protective effect that vitamin D may have on lung function ,” said Alexander C. White MS, MD, chair of the American Thoracic Society’s Tobacco Action Committee.

“First and foremost, patients who smoke should be fully informed about the health consequences of smoking and in addition be given all possible assistance to help them quit smoking.”

 

Story Source: American Thoracic Society

Journal Reference:

American Thoracic Society (ATS) (2012, July 20). Vitamin D may protect lung function in smokers.

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

Study: Red Meat Intake Increases Risk Of Stroke

Stroke Diagram

Stroke Diagram (Photo credit: ConstructionDealMkting)

Important followup study reports…

Red Meat Boosts Risk Of Stroke

Eating more red meat increases the risk of stroke, according to a new meta-analysis by researchers in Poland and Sweden. Previous research on meat and stroke risk has shown a range of results, so scientists combined 6 studies totaling 329,495 participants and 10,630 cases of stroke to obtain more definitive answers.

The researchers concluded that each additional one serving per day of red meat was associated with an 11%-13% greater risk of stroke. The added risk was indicated entirely in ischemic stroke, the most common kind, and not in hemorrhagic stroke.

All types of red meat, including fresh meat, beef, steak, as well as processed meats such as bacon and sausage, and pork (also known as “the other white meat“), were linked to extra stroke risk; Not surprisingly, processed meats were linked to 13% greater risk per extra daily serving.

Research scientists involved in the study speculated that meat could increase overall stroke risk, because of its high saturated fat content, oxidative stress associated with iron in meat, as well as the commonly used preservatives in processed meats. .

 

Story Source: Stoke

Journal Reference:

 

National Stroke Association

Centennial, CO 80112 info@stroke.org

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

High Fat Diets Associated With Diminished Fertlity In Men

The Effects of a Paleolithic Omnivore Meat bas...

The Effects of a Paleolithic Omnivore Meat based Diet. (Photo credit: Paleo-Caveman-Omnivore-LowCarb-Meat-Diet-Info)

A man’s diets, specifically the amount and type of different fats they eat, are associated with their semen quality according to the results of a study in the journal Human Reproduction.

The study of 99 men in the USA found a key association between a high total fat intake and lower total sperm count and concentration. It also found that men who ate more omega-3 polyunsaturated fats (the healthy type of fats often found in fish and plant oils) produced better quality sperm than men who ate less.

However, the researchers explained that this is a small study, and its findings need to be replicated by further research in order to be sure about the role played by fats on men’s fertility.

It is suggested that men make changes to their diets to reduce the amount of saturated fat they eat and increase their omega-3 intake. This may not only improve their general health, but could improve their reproductive health too.

At a global level, adopting these lifestyle modifications may improve general health, as high saturated fat diets are known to be a risk factor for a range of cardiovascular diseases; but, in addition, our research suggests that it could be beneficial for reproductive health worldwide.”

A number of previous studies have investigated the link between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality, with mixed results. However, little is known about the potential role of dietary fats and semen quality, the researchers investigated
the relationship in men attending a fertility clinic.

Between December 2006 and August 2010 they questioned the men about their diet and analyzed samples of their semen; they also measured levels of fatty acids in sperm and seminal plasma in 23 of the 99 men participating.

The men were divided into three groups according to the amount of fats they consumed. Those in the third with the highest fat intake had a 43% lower total sperm count and 38% lower sperm concentration than men in the third with the
lowest fat intake. “Total sperm count” is defined as the total number of sperm in the ejaculate, while “sperm concentration” is defined as the concentration of sperm (number per unit volume).

The World Health Organization (WHO) provides a definition of “normal” total sperm count and concentration as follows: the total number of spermatozoa in the ejaculate should be at least 39 million; the concentration of spermatozoa
should be at least 15 million per ml.

The study found that the relationship between dietary fats and semen quality was affected by the consumption of saturated fats. Men consuming the most saturated fats had a 35% lower total sperm count than men eating the least, and a 38% lower sperm concentration.

“The magnitude of the association is quite dramatic and provides further support for the health efforts to limit consumption of saturated fat given their relation with other health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease,” said the researchers..

Men consuming the most omega-3 fats had slightly more sperm (1.9%) that were correctly formed than men in the third that had the lowest omega-3 intake.

It’s important to note… 71% of all the men in the study were overweight or obese, and the health effects of this could also affect semen quality. The researchers made allowances for this. “We were able to isolate the independent effects of fat intake from those of obesity using statistical models,” they explained. “Notably, the frequency of overweight and obesity among men in this study does not
differ much from that among men in the general population in the USA (74%).”

This is the largest study to date examining the influence of specific dietary fats on male fertility. The researchers concluded “Given the limitations of the current study, in particular the fact that it is a cross-sectional analysis and that it is the first report of a relation between dietary fat and semen quality, it is essential that these findings be reproduced in future work.”

Research scientists are continuing to investigate how dietary and lifestyle factors influence fertility in men and women as well as the treatment outcomes of couples undergoing fertility treatment.

Story Source: European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE),

Journal Reference: Human Reproduction, 2012;

European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) (2012, March 12).

 

This article is for informational and educational purposes only;  It is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Consult your doctor or healthcare professional.

 

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